Hooks-and-Lines

Fish are attracted to hooks-and-lines by natural or artificial bair placed on a hook, which captures the fish when it bites the bait. One or multiple lines may be used to catch pelagic, demersal, or benthic species. Different line and hook types are used depending on the target species.
<br><br>
<i>Set longlines</i> are used near the ocean bottom and consist of regularly spaced shorter lines, or snoods, attached to a long main line. <i> Drifting longlines </i> have a main line kept near the surface by floats, with baited hooks attached to long snoods. <i>Trolling lines</i> are towed behind a vessel at the surface or depth, and use baited hooks or lures. <i>Vertical lines</i> are attached to a sinker and have one or multiple hooks. <i> Poles and lines</i>, consisting of a baited hook or lure attached to a pole, are the gear type most frequently used by recreational fishermen. <i>Handlines</i>, such as those used for squid jigging, are vertically weighted lines attached to bait or lures; fish are hauled up into the boat when caught.
<br><br>
For more detailed information, please visit the FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department <a href="http://www.fao.org/fishery/geartype/109/en" target="_blank"> hooks and lines</a> web page.

Displaying 71 - 80 of 142

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

North Pacific Ocean

Target catch: 

None reported

Effect on bycatch species: 

In experiement 1, the mean number of seabirds appearing and the catch per unit effort (for seabirds) was not statistically different between the four tori-lines. In experiment 2, seabird attack rates (Laysan albatross and shearwater) were not statistic

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Eastern Australia

Target catch: 

Tuna

Effect on bycatch species: 

Live bait sank more quickly than dead bait, increasing the exposure of hooks to seabirds but the sink rates of individual live bait species were very variable. With respect to dead bait, those on the 160 g leaded swivel with a distance of 2 m leader len

Effect on target catch: 

None reported

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Eastern Australia

Target catch: 

Tuna

Effect on bycatch species: 

Mainlines with a loose configuration reached depth more slowly than tight configurations, allowing more time for seabirds to become incidentally hooked

Effect on target catch: 

None reported

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

eastern Pacific Ocean

Target catch: 

Tuna

Effect on bycatch species: 

Significant differences between J and circle hook size 15 and between J and circle hook size 16 were found in the bycatch species group (all species grouped together). Chub mackerel bait caught the sharks.

Effect on target catch: 

No significant differences in catch rates of the target species were found between hook types. The highest catch rates for tunas were found on circle hooks size 15. Squid and jack mackerel bait had the highest catch rates for tunas.

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

northwest Pacific Ocean

Target catch: 

Pelagic species

Effect on bycatch species: 

None reported

Effect on target catch: 

There were no significant differences in catch rates between hook types but squid bait caught significantly more blue and silky sharks and dolphinfish.

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Mazaltan, Mexico

Target catch: 

Pelagic species

Effect on bycatch species: 

None reported

Effect on target catch: 

Circle hooks had the highest catch rates for the principal target species, blue and striped marlin.

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

South-western Atlantic Ocean

Target catch: 

Tuna, blue sharks, swordfish

Effect on bycatch species: 

The incidental capture of loggerhead sea turtles was reduced by 55% and for leatherback sea turtles by 65% when circle hooks were used.

Effect on target catch: 

Catch rates of targeted species including bigeye and albacore tuna and blue sharks were increased with the use of circle hooks, while no difference was found for yellowfin tuna, shortfin mako or hammerhead sharks or for dolphinfish.

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

South Africa

Target catch: 

tuna

Effect on bycatch species: 

Catch rates of birds were higher on unweighted compared to weighted branchlines.

Effect on target catch: 

Catch rates of fish were not significantly different between the two branchline types at night or during the dawn.

Article: 

Bycatch species: 

Reduction technique: 

Fishing Gear: 

Pages