Sharks

Displaying 21 - 30 of 42

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Eastern Pacific Ocean

Target catch: 

Billfish and tuna

Effect on bycatch species: 

Significant differences were found between J4 and C15 and between J4 and C18.

Effect on target catch: 

Significant differences between catch rates were only found between the J-4 and C18 hooks. Large circle hooks (C18) had the lowest catch rates for tunas and small circle hooks (C15) had the lowest catch rates for billfish

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Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Pacific Ocean

Target catch: 

Tuna

Effect on bycatch species: 

Blue and oceanic whitetip shark bycatch increased.

Effect on target catch: 

Tuna catches were significantly higher, but lengths for bigeye and skipjack were smaller; shortbill spearfish and striped marlin catch was lower; no difference in swordfish catch rates, but lengths were greater

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Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Massachusettes Bay

Target catch: 

Silver hake

Effect on bycatch species: 

Over 88% of spiny dogfish were excluded by the grate regardless of color or gear configuration.

Effect on target catch: 

Within typical commercial quantities

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Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Brazil

Target catch: 

tuna (pelagic) and sharks (bottom)

Effect on bycatch species: 

CPUE was significantly higher for night, blue, silky, and oceanic whitetip sharks on circle hooks.

Effect on target catch: 

None reported for pelagic longlines. On bottom longlines, CPUE was higher for blacknose and nurse sharks and southern stingrays; no CPUE difference between hook type; more tiger and blacknose sharks were alive at haulback with circle hooks

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Species: 

Carcharhinus obscurus

The dusky shark is currently listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN, but populations continue to decline. The dusky shark is one of the slowest-growing, latest-maturing sharks, bearing small litters after a glong gestation period. These characteristics make the shark especially vulnerable to depletion by fisheries. In the Northwest Atlantic, dusky sharks began to decline in the 1970s, when they were targeted by recreational fishers. They continued to decrease due to directed catch in US shark fisheries in the 1980s.

Distribution: 

Patchy, coastal in tropical and warm temperate seas

Population: 

Decreasing
Photo: Malcolm Nobbs www.malcolmnobbs.com

IUCN Status: 

Vulnerable

Type: 

Fish

Bycatch Threat: 

Longlines, gillnets, hook and line, trawls

Study Type: 

Field study in the wild

Location: 

Northern Australia

Target catch: 

Prawns

Effect on bycatch species: 

Reduced shark catches by 36.3%

Effect on target catch: 

Reduced the proportion of soft and damaged prawns by 41.6% and reduced catches of tiger prawns by 6.5%

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